Audioshake

image_pdfimage_print

A Whole Lot of Shaking Goin' On

by Kara M. Bachman

Sometimes, separating the components of music – for instance, pulling out the bass, the guitar, or the fiddle – allows musicians to use their recordings in new, innovative ways. Whether it’s to create a karaoke track, alter a song for use in a commercial, remix a song, grab an instrument and bring it forward, tone it down, or isolate it completely usually takes some tech-savvy.

The new Audioshake AI platform hopes to make this process much easier for indie musicians. It allows a musician to upload a song, separate the various components – called stems – and use them differently.

Think in terms of deconstructing an existing piece of music and then rebuilding it. It’s kind of like that.

“We are very focused on helping artists and rights holders make more money for their work,” said Audioshake CEO Jessica Powell, explaining that separating the stems of a piece of music – whether it’s rock, hip-hop, or acoustic roots – allows an artist or sound engineer to “increase the energy of one sound versus another.”  

By all measures, the tech has been getting nods of approval. Audioshake won Sony’s Demixing Challenge, beating out tech companies such as Facebook and Byte Dance. It’s currently in the toolkit of artists with major labels and used by big acts like Green Day. The Audioshake platform has isolated parts of the music for commercials for companies, such as Oreo, and helped create a trailer for Netflix. 

Vibrant Vietnamese-American singer/songwriter, Thuy, sets herself apart in today’s pop R&B scene.

Steve Tissiman is a South African singer-songwriter based in London, UK, returns the classic Hollywood feel to today’s music.

A few artists who reimagined their work through Audioshake Indie.

Houston Kendrick is a new wave, genre-bending songster who blends rap, R&B, and pop, with powerful prose reflecting on childhood, young love, and the journey of self-discovery.

In other words …it’s been a pretty warm reception.

Powell sounds quite excited – as she should be – that punk-pop rockers Green Day embraced the new platform and recently released music on their Tik Tok that they’d created using it. Powell said that the video clip  – for the song “2,000 Lightyears Away” – already has well over a million views.

Powell said the band lost the masters to its 1991 album, “Kerplunk,” so they used Audioshake to create stems. It was the only way to isolate the things they needed.

But does this technology apply to something more old-fashioned, such as bluegrass? Of course, Powell assures.

“We are actually working on a documentary project about bluegrass music,” Powell said. “They have quite a few bluegrass and acoustic pieces happening throughout the documentary.”

In other words …it’s been a pretty warm reception.

Powell sounds quite excited – as she should be – that punk-pop rockers Green Day embraced the new platform and recently released music on their Tik Tok that they’d created using it. Powell said that the video clip  – for the song “2,000 Lightyears Away” – already has well over a million views.

Powell said the band lost the masters to its 1991 album, “Kerplunk,” so they used Audioshake to create stems. It was the only way to isolate the things they needed.

But does this technology apply to something more old-fashioned, such as bluegrass? Of course, Powell assures.

“We are actually working on a documentary project about bluegrass music,” Powell said. “They have quite a few bluegrass and acoustic pieces happening throughout the documentary.”

“In live performance, you have a lot of bleed and a lot of things you’d want to edit out,” Powell explained.

For instance, background noises from a crowd you might find at live bluegrass performances or in a jazz club.

She didn’t divulge the artist’s name, but Powell spoke of a highly well-known jazz artist for which Audioshake is coming into play. 

“A big jazz project is underway,” she said, “where we pulled apart an entire album.”

In this case, Audioshake is doing all the work, an option available to indie artists who aren’t “techy” and would prefer just to let someone else use the platform to massage the selected tracks.

“With one of the jazz musicians, it’s his widow,” Powell said, of how she just turned the music over to Audioshake. “She just sent us the songs, and we uploaded it.”

For most, however, using the platform directly is simple – and most affordable. 

“They upload a song,” Powell explained, “select stem types they want, and then listen to a sample…if they like it, they can purchase it.” 

Powell thinks tech such as that offered by Audioshake will continue to become more and more relevant. 

“There’s gonna be so many music experiences that will be immersive,” she said, “and use surround sound.” Think Virtual Reality.

“Right now, people are sort of blown away by the technology,” Powell said, “but at some point, it’s just going to become a part of people’s workflow.”